Deadly Thinking Workshops

DeadlyThinking Workshops

DeadlyThinking Workshops

Question1: The linkbetween povertyandmentalhealth

Therelationshipexistingbetween povertyandmentalsicknessis complexbecauseeachone factorcan leadto theother.Startingwith thementalillness,peoplewith seriousmentalsicknessesfacenumerouschallengesin their life.Forexample,mentallyillpeopleare oftendiscriminatedagainst andstigmatized (Williamson, 2007). Thislimitstheir capacityto secureemploymentopportunitiesandadequateeducationthat can helpthem pursuetheir goalsin life.Thelimitedopportunityto acquiresecureemploymentorengagein economically productiveactivitiesreducesthecapacityof thementallyillto earnincomethat is adequateto sustainthemselves andtheir families.Eventually,thementallyillpersonsdriftinto poverty.

Healthypeoplewhoexperienceeconomichardshipsare at a higherriskof sufferingfrom mentalillnessescomparedto thegeneralpopulation.Thisis becauselackof resourceslimitsone’s capacityto accessthebasicnecessities,suchas education,qualityhealthcare,andhousing(Borton, 2011). Lackof thesenecessitiescompromisesthequalityof life,which may be followedby strainandstress.Prolongedstressresultsin anxietyanddepression,which are thekeypredisposing factorsformentalillness.In addition,povertylimitsthepatients’capacityto accesspreventivehealthcare,thusincreasingtheriskof sufferingfrom mentalsickness.Thesecondtypeof relationshipwherepovertyleadsto mentalsicknessis commonamong theAustralian Aboriginals than thecasewherementalillnessleadsto poverty.However,theonsetof mentalillnessexacerbatespovertyamong theaffectedpersons.

Question2: Tools andtechniquesusedto helpparticipantsworkwith their people

Thefirsttoolthatthe usesto helpparticipantsworkwith their peopleis theestablishmentof networks.Duringtheworkshops,invitesgettheopportunitytoidentifyotherparticipantsfrom their communityandare willingto promoteemotionalandsocialwellbeing (Australian Centre forRural andRemote Mental Health, 2015). Thenetworksprovideparticipantswith an opportunityto continuesharingknowledgeon howto enhancementalhealthin their communityevenafter theworkshops.

Thesecondstrategyinvolvestrainingparticipantson howtheycan transfertheknowledgetheygainfrom theworkshopto othermembersin thecommunitywhodidnot attendtheworkshop.Thistechniqueisreferredto as thetrainingthetrainers(Murali &amp Oyebode, 2014). Thisensuresthat&nbsptheskillsandknowledgepassedto participantsarespreadandusedto addresstheneedsof thecommunity.Increasingthenumberof trainedtrainersensuresthatthe skillsintended to addressmentalhealthissuesspreadrapidlyin thesociety.

Thethirdstrategyinvolvesequippingparticipantswith skillsthat helpthem expresstheir worriesandstresses(ACRRMH, 2015). Participantsarealsoequippedwith theskillsthattheycan useto helpothers expresstheir worriesas well,thusenhancingthewellbeing of their community.

Question3: Community participationandpromotionof health

Theconceptof communityparticipationinvolvestheengagementof themembersof thecommunityin makingdecisions,settingpriorities,planninghealthstrategies,andtakingpartin theimplementation of strategiesdesignedto promotehealth(Heritage &amp Dooris, 2009).In essence,communityparticipationseeksto empowermembersof thecommunityby helpingthem assumeownership,aswellas thecontrolof their health.Theconceptof participationis based on thenotionthatconsumersof healthcarehavethepotential to impacttheir healthcareoutcomewhenever theyareactively engagedin theprocessesof decision-making,providedwith self-management skills,andqualityinformation(Brand, Stone &amp Atkinson, 2007).There are two majoractivitiesthat supporttheprocessof empowerment. First,educatingmembersof thecommunityof approachesthat theycan useto identifythehealthproblemsincreasestheir awarenessof thehealthneedsof their community.Secondly,membersshould be informedabout their responsibilitiesandrolesin promotingthewell-beingof eachmember.

Aneffectiveparticipatory programshould ensurethree majorissues.First,theprogramshould focuson supportingthecommunityat grassroots level through capacitybuilding(Brand, Stone &amp Atkinson, 2007). Secondly,theprogramshould establishnetworksthrough which membersof thecommunitycareshareknowledge.Third,theprogramshould establishcommitmentfora purposefulorganizational developmentin orderto ensurethattheparticipationhas a significantinfluenceon themainstream.

Question4: Primary prevention

Primarypreventioninvolvesspecifichealthpromotionandhealthprotection.Healthpromotionincludesactivitiesorchoicesthat donot requireclinical intervention.Forexample,theDeadly Thinking focuseson traininghealthypeoplewith theobjectiveof preventingtheoccurrenceof mentalillness(ACRRMH, 2015). Thetrainingdoesnot requireclinical interventionsince participantsare not sick.Specificprotection,on theotherhand,meansthatthepreventionstrategiesa giventypeof diseaseandaimsat achievinga givensetof goals.In thecaseof Deadly Thinking, preventionstrategiesare designedto preventtheoccurrenceof mentalillnessandtheobjectivesof theseprogramsincludetheenhancementof thewell-beingof theentirecommunity(ACRRMH, 2015).

Theobjectivesof primaryprotectionare achievedby educatingmembersof thecommunity(Castillo, 2014). Theprocessof educatingpeopleinvolvesgivingthem theskillsandtheknowledgethattheyneedto protectthem andreducechancesof sufferingfrom diseases,suchas mentalillness.

References

AustralianCentre for Rural and Remote Mental Health (2015). Indigenous: Ourprograms. ARRMH.Retrieved March 28, 2015, from http://www.acrrmh.com.au/indigenous/

Brand,M., Stone, J. &amp Atkinson, K. (2007). ISEPICHguidelines for community participation in health promotion.Port Phillip: ISEPICH.

Borton,C. (2011). Povertyand mental health.Leeds: Egton Medical Information System Limited.

Castillo,L. (2014). Education and community-based programs. HealthyPeople.Retrieved March 28, 2015, fromhttps://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/educational-and-community-based-programs

Heritage,Z. &amp Dooris, M. (2009). Community participation and empowermentin health cities. HealthPromotion International,24 (1), 45-55.

Murali,V. &amp Oyebode, F. (2014). Poverty: Social inequality and mentalhealth. BritishJournal of Psychology,10 (3), 2-16.

Williamson,D. (2007). Povertyand mental illness.Ontario: Canadian Mental Health Association.