Chapters annotation

CHAPTERS ANNOTATION 5

Napier, R., &amp Gershenfeld, M.K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience. Boston: Houghton MifflinCompany.

In Chapter 4, Napier andGershenfeld highlight the importance goals in groups. The authorsassert that it is vital to set realistic and motivating goals thatwill propel the group into working to achieve them. Excellent resultsand performance are attained when set goals are challenging and seton a fixed deadline. Groups can use goals to evaluate results andperformance. Goals motivate group members to develop creativestrategies that will facilitate realization of goals, hence,influencing the performance and behavior of group members. Theauthors emphasize that groups that have set difficult and realisticgoals realize better results than groups that have no goals or seteasy goals.

The chapter gives insight on therole of goals in achieving excellent group results. The authors usepractical examples that enhance the comprehension of the subject. The theories discussed in the chapter are connected to practical lifeexperiences yet presented in an intellectual manner. The goaltheories discussed in the chapter offer a better understanding on howto enhance comfort and performance in groups.

The text is suitable forclassroom and organizational use. Chapter 4 offers insight on howgroupings can be used to achieve excellent results in organizations.The author uses simple organization and logical arrangement of ideasmaking it easy and fun to read. The chapter design of outliningthings to do and use of examples is suitable for students. Real lifeexperiences outlined in the chapter leaves no doubt that the authorsconducted a thorough research on the subject. Readers should find thechapter’s style enjoyable, informative and engaging.

Morrell, M., &amp Capparell, S.(2002). Shackleton`s way: Leadership lessons from the great Antarcticexplorer. New York, N.Y: Penguin.

In the third chapter,“Developing a spirit of Camaraderie,” Morell and Capprel statethat Shakelton always made cautious observation before acting onanything. Shakelton broke down conventional hierarchies put in workplace. This facilitated good communication, sharing of ideas andinteraction amongst his crew. As a leader, Shakelton establishedrules, routine and order that enabled all his crew members tounderstand their position. Considering the harsh climatic conditionsthat Shakelton and his team endured, he made use of unofficialmeetings to build and strengthen the spirit de corps among his crew.

Shakelton’s leadershipstrategy fits well in contemporary work place. The text offersinsight on a leadership style and principles that can be practiced incontemporary business environment. The chapter illustrates that goodmanagement style does not have to be hierarchical instead, it shouldencourage, sharing of ideas, good communication and teamwork. Theinformation is presented in a narrative style, making it interestingto read and comprehend the subject matter. The authors understand theleadership challenge of developing a teamwork spirit in the workplace. As a result, they have illustrated Shakelton’s strategy ofcreating comradeship. I find the text suitable for students andbusiness leaders. The authors use a simple language to present thechapter idea. Furthermore, the real life examples presented in thechapter makes it easy for readers to connect with leadershipchallenges in real life, hence implement the teaching in work places.

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References

Morrell, M., &amp Capparell, S.(2002). Shackleton`s way: Leadership lessons from the great Antarcticexplorer. New York, N.Y: Penguin.

Napier, R., &amp Gershenfeld, M.K. (2004). Groups: Theory and experience. Boston: Houghton MifflinCompany