Annotated Bibliography

AnnotatedBibliography

Unit

Hamilton,Susan. FrancesPower Cobbe and Victorian feminism,New York: Palgrave

MacMillan.2006. Print.

Thisbook is relevant to the study considering that it addresses the issueof feminism and how writing and literature works can be used to pushthe feminism agenda. The author makes it clear that increasedinvolvement of women in literature and mainstream press rather thanjust feminist press will aid to achieve feminist goals. The authorspecifically points to Frances Power Cobbe’s main accomplishment ofarticulating and promoting feminist views in the male-dominatedmainstream press as opposed to feminist press. She seems to implythat the categorization of a certain press or form of writing asfeminist would marginalize women and conform to male definition ofliberated women. The same case is evident in Edith Wharton’s shortstory, “Souls Belated”, where the main character, Lydia, refusesto exercise her freedom within the controls of a man. She refuses toexercise her freedom to marry her lover, Garnett, simply because herhusband, Tillotson, has divorced her. She identifies marriage anddivorce, with all their conventions and rules largely made by amale-dominated society, as tools to control and oppress women. Shethus objects the idea of marrying Garnett as a way of expressing herfeminist freedom at a time she is being released from the shackles ofanother marriage. Marrying Garnet would definitely defeat the idea offreedom. Wharton’s ideas thus combine with Hamilton’s to showthat female freedom or feminist writing should not be controlled bymen by being categorized into a special category but rather acceptedwholly in the mainstream society where women have an equalopportunity to exercise their writing and freedom, not at the whim ofmen but at their own accord.

Workscited

Hamilton,Susan. FrancesPower Cobbe and Victorian feminism,New York: Palgrave

MacMillan.2006. Print.

Wharton,Edith. “Souls Belated.” In SoulsBelated and Other Stories.New York: Everyman.